Alberta adds detox beds, Edmonton nasal naloxone pilot in response to overdoses

A one-year pilot project will be launched in Edmonton in response to the overdose crisis that will see $1.5 million spent on nasal naloxone kits and $2.1 million over three years for 35 additional medical detox beds.

Associate Minister of Mental Health and Addictions Jason Luan said starting June 15, people in Edmonton will have access to more nasal naloxone kits — which can reverse the effects of opioid overdose — at the George Spady Society.

As the pilot continues, more distribution sites will be added.

Click to play video: 'EMS responded to 55 opioid-related calls in Edmonton in 2-day period' EMS responded to 55 opioid-related calls in Edmonton in 2-day period

EMS responded to 55 opioid-related calls in Edmonton in 2-day period

“Nasal naloxone is much easier to administer,” Luan said. “One nasal spray is approximately the same as five injectable naloxone kits.

Story continues below advertisement

“It can get the heart started and person breathing again so they can immediately seek emergency care.”

The additional kits will be added to the current capacity across the province. Since January 2016, 350,000 injectable naloxone kits have been supplied, the minister said.

Nearly 26,000 overdose reversals have been reported, Luan added.

Read more: Edmonton police officers to carry naloxone spray

“The Edmonton Police Service is looking forward to participating in the nasal naloxone pilot program for those suffering from addiction,” police chief Dale McFee said.

“I’m eager to see the results of this initiative and how it will help prevent overdoses. We all need to work together to address the challenges faced by those with addictions in our city.”

First responders and community agencies will provide feedback on the pilot project and the province will consider “how we can roll this out over to a province-wide approach,” Luan said.

McFee said the two-initiative announcement from the province was a “positive and much-needed step forward” to the balanced approach that’s been “needed for quite some time.”

He added he’s looking forward to additional steps forward on the ground.

Story continues below advertisement

Click to play video: 'Questions remain after 3 bodies found in central Edmonton; province suspects drug overdoses' Questions remain after 3 bodies found in central Edmonton; province suspects drug overdoses

Questions remain after 3 bodies found in central Edmonton; province suspects drug overdoses – May 22, 2021

Wrap-around services available at the George Spady Society include a supervised consumption site, mental health, addiction and housing supports, as well as detox beds.

The Wednesday announcement will see Alberta invest $2.1 million over three years for the George Spady Society to open 35 medical detox beds.

Luan said those additional beds mean 4,550 Albertans will have the opportunity to receive medical detox support over the next three years.

Read more: EMS responded to 55 opioid-related calls in Edmonton in 2-day period: AHS

“We are pleased that the George Spady Society will now have a full range of medical services available in our detox unit,” CEO Lorette Garrick said.

“The detox unit is unique as it’s in the same building as our supervised consumption site.

Story continues below advertisement

“This shift in our services gives us greater opportunity to support Albertans in achieving recovery,” she said.

“We are continuing to work with our community partners to support a full range of services in Edmonton.”

Naloxone will be distributed for free to those who are at risk of experience or witnessing an overdose.

Read more: Advocates raise concern over closure of Edmonton supervised consumption site: ‘It’s puzzling’

McFee said the opioid crisis is a very significant concern.

“The urgent action that you’ve taken is very much appreciated by our front lines,” he told Luan.

“The opioid crisis doesn’t just affect individuals; it affects entire communities,” McFee said. “That’s something we’ve seen in the recent weeks.”

Read more: Edmonton social agency calls for urgent action on overdose crisis: ‘We need to respond’

In May, an Edmonton social agency urged the province to act urgently to prevent more overdose deaths.

Boyle Street Community Services called on government and community partners — including the Edmonton Police Service, Alberta Health and Alberta Health Services — to help create an emergency coordinated response and command centre to the overdose crisis involving police, AHS and the provincial government, quicker and more fulsome data (including location information) on overdoses.

Story continues below advertisement

Boyle Street would also like to see all front-line social workers have access to naloxone kits and more outreach programming.

“There’s a number of things we can do immediately.

“We need to do those things urgently to save lives now and reduce the amount of death that’s happening,” executive director Jordan Reiniger said on May 25, following three overdose deaths in downtown Edmonton on May 21.

On Wednesday, Luan thanked community groups for their advocacy on this complex issue.

“We very much appreciate the care and compassion many of our community and service providers have shown,” he said. “It’s encouraged us to work around the clock, non-stop to continue to build on the services and create new ways of doing things.”

He did not say if the province was considering Boyle Street’s other requests.

Click to play video: 'Edmonton city councillor Scott McKeen calls for overdose pilot program, declaration of public health emergency' Edmonton city councillor Scott McKeen calls for overdose pilot program, declaration of public health emergency

Edmonton city councillor Scott McKeen calls for overdose pilot program, declaration of public health emergency – Mar 15, 2021

Alberta Health Services said, between May 31 and June 1, EMS responded to 55 opioid-related calls in the Edmonton zone. Naloxone was given during 50 of those incidents and EMS took 34 patients to hospital.

Story continues below advertisement

Overdose deaths nearly doubled in Edmonton in 2020, according to Boyle Street Community Services, rising from 267 in 2019 to 485 in 2020. Data indicates they’re rising again this year.

“Year over year there’s been about a 100 per cent increase in the number of overdose deaths,” Reiniger said.

McFee stressed Wednesday that a multi-pronged approach is essential.

“We will not arrest our way out of this crisis. What we’re seeing today is putting balance into the equation.”

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

View original article here Source