Sheree Fertuck’s gravel contract, competition discussed in court

The Greg Fertuck murder trial has heard details of a gravel contract worth hundreds of thousand of dollars that Sheree Fertuck was working on prior to her death.

Sheree, who relatives describe as generous, family-oriented and hard-working, initially lost the bid to a rival hauler.

Read more: Greg Fertuck’s daughter describes history of drinking, violence: ‘He threatened her life’

However, Sheree was awarded the contract after her competitor’s gravel loads were lighter than promised, according to Martin Koyle, a project manager with TexCana Logistics.

The company’s fertilizer plant planned for the Hanley area needed gravel for roads, building bases and rail beds, he said.

The company paid Sheree’s family corporation, Sorotski Holdings, approximately $200,000, Koyle testified. The defence has suggested the contract was worth $2 million, though Koyle said the entire project was less than $2 million.

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During Thursday’s testimony, Koyle said Sheree was an “aggressive” businesswoman, meaning she was eager to work, but not violent or angry.

Sheree Fertuck was last seen on Dec. 7, 2015. Her estranged husband, Greg Fertuck, was arrested and charged in June 2019. Facebook / Saskatchewan RCMP

He’d heard rumours that Sheree didn’t get along with her competitor from the same area, he testified.

One of Sheree’s daughters, Lanna Fertuck, said Wednesday that her mother had a “tiff” with the businessman, but she said Greg Fertuck was the only person with a motive for murder.

Greg Fertuck has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder and offering an indignity to a body related to Sheree’s disappearance on Dec. 7, 2015. Police arrested him in June 2019, after an undercover operation known as a Mr. Big sting.

Read more: Greg Fertuck told undercover officer he murdered estranged wife Sheree Fertuck: Crown

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Mr. Big stings are often viewed as contentious. They involve police posing as criminals in an attempt to gain the trust of a suspect in order to elicit a confession.

Sheree’s body has never been found.

Her truck was still running when Darren Sorotski, Sheree’s brother, found it on Dec. 8, 2015. The doors were unlocked and the trailer wasn’t loaded, he testified.

Sheree’s jacket was also in the truck’s cab, along with her cellphone. Court heard there wasn’t any cell reception in the pit.

A front-end loader was also present at the pit with the doors locked. The loader had been equipped with a scale in order to ensure Sheree’s deliveries were more accurate than her competitor’s.

Under cross-examination by defence lawyer Morris Bodnar, Sorotski said the scale was vandalized at some point before Sheree’s disappearance. They never found out who did it.

Sheree Fertuck’s front-end loader was equipped with a scale to ensure she was hauling an accurate amount of gravel. Court Exhibit

During his opening statement, Crown prosecutor Cory Bliss said Greg Fertuck used the loader to lift Sheree’s body into the back of his pickup truck.

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Ronald Matycio, Sheree’s uncle, took part in the search effort following Sheree’s disappearance. He recalled seeing Sheree’s competitor on foot, helping look for her.

Read more: Sheree Fertuck’s friend remembers loving, hard-working mother

He never saw Greg Fertuck searching, nor did Sorotski, court heard.

Matycio also described running into the accused at a reatil store and asking whether he’d heard anything about the missing woman. Matycio said Greg Fertuck didn’t ask about the search or whether he could help.

Police executed two warrants at Greg Fertuck’s Saskatoon home: one in the weeks after Sheree’s disappearance and the other was following the police sting in June 2019.

A banana clip and ammunition found during a search warrant executed at Greg Fertuck’s home in December 2015. Court Exhibit

Among several other items, police found .22 calibre ammunition and a magazine. The Crown’s theory is that Greg Fertuck used a .22 calibre gun to shoot Sheree before disposing of the gun in a rural area outside Saskatoon.

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Justice Richard Danyliuk is presiding over the eight-week, judge-alone trial. With the Crown’s evidence presented in a voir dire, he will ultimately decide if it is admissible.

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Greg Fertuck’s daughter describes history of drinking, violence

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