Death toll from COVID-19 continues to climb in Manitoba with 5 new fatalities

WINNIPEG — Five more Manitobans have died of COVID-19 as the province continues to experience a deadly trend of increasing fatalities and COVID-19 cases.

On Tuesday, the province reported five new deaths all of which are in Winnipeg. These people include a woman in her 60s, a woman in her 80s, two men in their 80s, and a man in his 90s. This is the 14th consecutive day Manitoba has reported deaths due to COVID-19.

One of the deaths, the man in his 80s, has been linked to the outbreak at the Maples personal care home.

Since March, 85 people have died of COVID-19 in Manitoba.

In addition to the deaths, the province announced 103 new cases of the virus, including:

• 13 cases in the Interlake-Eastern health region;

• 12 cases in the Northern health region;

• two cases in the Prairie Mountain Health region;

• 15 cases in the Southern Health–Santé Sud health region; and

• 61 cases in the Winnipeg health region.

These new cases bring the total number of cases in Manitoba since March to 6,377. One case was removed from Manitoba’s total, as it was an out-of-town case.

The province reported 130 people are in hospital, including 20 people who are in intensive care. The current five-day test positivity rate in Manitoba has decreased slightly to 8.6 per cent. As of Tuesday, the province said 2,797 people have recovered.

The province said 2,410 tests were completed yesterday, bringing the total number of lab tests done since early February to 265,264.

The majority of Manitoba’s cases, deaths, and hospitalizations are in the Winnipeg region, which has seen 4,059 cases since March. The province said the test positivity rate in Winnipeg is now 9.3 per cent.

Winnipeg is currently under the red or critical level on the pandemic response system. In Winnipeg, the province said if one person in a household is symptomatic, the entire household must self-isolate while waiting for COVID test results. More information about self-isolating rules can be found online.

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